Tag Archives: demonic resurrection india

Bangalore Open Air 2013 : Introduction, announcements and a chat with the organizers

In a bid to broaden India’s metal horizons, Infinite Dreams founder Salman Syed and his team have taken up the arduous task of doing what seemed like a distant dream just a few years ago.

bangalore open air 2013 logo

Such is the trappings of our mundane life that escaping the daily routine and hating the unreasonable comes easy. After a long bout of gigs, festivals and metal parties across the United Kingdom in 2012, the last thing I wanted was to not have a festival back home. That culture is zealously and emphatically addictive. All the celebrations and mammoth gatherings of like-minded, carefree, metal-loving population across the globe is something that is looked forward to. All year round.

For starters let’s not forget we did not even have local gigs happening in India. There was no such thing called live metal gig for us. Just over a decade ago, the sonic boom that causes your ears to bleed was a craving. I remember being present at gigs where the total attendance was not more than 30 people including the playing bands. Shame. Today, after Iron Maiden ventured into our territory in 2007, the penetration of international acts is seen as an overdose by many. The question remains unanswered and the answer lies within. Not hard to figure out, as the answer goes something like – Pack your bags and attend.

2012 was a game changer. Heavy metal aficionado and manager of Bangalore-based band Kryptos, Salman Syed decided to break the barrels and open the gates for all of us to be able to experience something massive. Brought to life by Infinite Dreams, in association with Wacken Open Air (Germany), Bangalore Open Air aided us maniacs to bring out our black accoutrements and witness real bands that have made their way to the top through sweat and only that.

bangalore open air 2013 line up poster

When quizzed about why exactly did he take this initiative, a very tied up Salman replies, “Having inspired by Wacken Open Air I wanted to create something along the same lines in India, and hence the idea was born and BOA is here“. In terms of the challenges faced in putting together a line-up like this one the man takes a very nonchalant approach. “After the first edition bands were excited to see the response and wanted to play at BOA so it wasn’t difficult to get them on board“.

The onus of handling the media section of BOA is on Bangalore-based Samarpita Samaddar. A short tête-à-tête with her provided me an insight into what is going through the minds of the organizers. And this is what Samarpita had to say, “We started BOA festival last year with just two international bands Suidakra and Kreator. It received a big response and was really successful. This year, it’s bigger and better with an unbelievable line-up“.

Going further, I wanted to know how exactly did the mainstream media welcome this concept of hosting such a humongous metal festival in India. “Though for mainstream media, heavy metal is a very niche genre so it is challenging but I have to say that we have got a very good response from the media as of now. A festival of this stature is never an easy game, it takes a lot for organizing it well, to make sure everything goes smoothly. The metal scene in India is changing widely across the country. With platforms like Wacken Metal Battle, India is seeing a steady growth in popularity and with festivals like BOA, we can see a mix of international and Indian bands playing more and more in India“, says Samarpita, who is also an independent publicist.

ihsahn live at bangalore open air 2013

One year old and still going strong (which is surprising for a festival in India that has only metal on the menu), BOA has managed to rope in some of the biggest names for the 2013 edition. Surprisingly there is variety which directly implies the turnout should be gigantic. In no particular order here’s what our retinas and eardrums would be subjected to this year:

1. Ihsahn (Norway) – Extreme Progressive Metal

2. Sodom (Germany) – Speed/Thrash Metal

3. Iced Earth (United States) – Power/Thrash Metal

4. Dark Tranquillity (Sweden) – Melodic Death Metal

5. Animals As Leaders (United States) – Instrumental Progressive

6. Leprous (Norway) – Progressive Metal

7. Demonic Resurrection (India) – Progressive Death/Black Metal

And, what kind of reception is expected this year, to which Salman signs off by saying, “I hope more and more people understand the importance of festivals, and I’m confident that this year it will be bigger and better at BOA“.

Do not let go of this unadulterated metal fest. Show your support because otherwise you would not have anywhere or anyone to run to for any kinda grievances and all your complaints would fall on deaf ears. Life waits for no one. Let your hair down and be a part of Bangalore Open Air.

[ Visit the official website here : Bangalore Open Air official website for details pertaining to the venue and ticket outlets. The tickets are priced at Rs. 2499. ]

Oh, and there is a poll as well:


Indian Black Metal Scene

Black Metalgenesis

We have been there where we were told that black metal was first done by Black Sabbath. But then we were also told Black Sabbath is the reason behind every other genre that ever happened. I for once do not agree to this, without taking away the credit from Sabbath for their contribution to metal. What is called the first wave of black metal that included Venom, Hellhammer, Bathory, Celtic Frost, and a significant Brazilian band Sarcófago just put forth the ground work but then what followed made it clear that even the aforementioned bands weren’t what was to become of black metal.

a church in Norway

A significant period in the history of a genre that righteously goes by the name black metal includes the early nineties. The place being Norway. Nothing ever remained the same. Now I saw myself getting dragged to the kind of songs being made under this genre mainly because of the complacency it gave me. But the truth remains that after being introduced to it, I went about the internet educating myself with the facts that lie behind the dark genre. After my exposure to the church burnings, and my research that led to my introduction of the real people behind the Norwegian era, the perception just became stronger. Here it was not some non-fictional stuff I had encountered, but something that was done, and went along with black metal. How much of it was done due to real hatred towards the cross or for the horned deity is a mystery but then no one would go take the risk of doing illegal activities at an age that could be too early to screw up things in life.

Black metalThe Indian scene

When I began writing this, there was no research required. Early nineties in India means no metal. To include something here I got reminded of only a few acts like Indus Creed, Parikrama, Dying Embrace, Bramha and maybe a few others that I do not want to even mention as they suck. So when the foundation of a genre was being laid in Norway there was just Parikrama jamming back home. Funny thought but ironically true! I will tell you some other time why exactly Pari-trauma should not be opening for Iron Maiden and now that they have done that twice how I want to sink the band and leave no trace. There was no metal in India for the longest time then talking about a major sub-genre would only add salt to injury.

Fate’s 2001 release

The earliest traces of black metal in India in some way can be related to Fate, Demonic Resurrection, Arcane Ritual – although they could be considered non-existent. But then they were away from the true definition of the genre. Whether it was conscious or not, they did lack the genre-related elements in their music even though they did claim to be black metal bands. Fate released an album in 2001 titled Lead Us To Darkness. With DR changing their style to play what they want to and not what they began playing, Fate and Arcane Ritual vanished without leaving behind just enough for other bands to carry the baton ahead. And then somewhere 1833 AD happened in 2004. And have been the longest running Indian black metal act I respect. I don’t have a choice but that does not take away 1833 AD‘s continuous prominent contribution.

1833 AD logo

There has not been any kind of impact, nor we have had any murders or controversies for the spark of this genre. Nothing significant enough to make heads turn in the direction. Sadly for our nation, even though there are hordes of followers of this genre, there aren’t any acts. There are none that can dominate in a discussion. Dark Crucifix from Kerala released Chapters of Damnation, a three song demo that was noticed. 1833 AD are still active and going strong with an album scheduled this year but then a single band for a vast genre, in a nation that has more humans than there is place is extremely poor.

There is also a band that goes by the name Mogh. I would not be surprised if you have not heard the name, but i would surprise you by stating that they have released four albums till now. And I have seen them cover Mayhem and Nargaroth at some mall in Pune. I was impressed. Now I do not hear of them, though I so want to.

mogh live!

Another notable band that was formed out of Disembodied Corpse was Cosmic Infusion. Cosmic, although not active anymore were as close to the roots as was the need. Covering Mourning Palace and I am the black wizards they managed to capitalize on the lack of good covers. They had prettyimpressive originals and personally i was a fan of their live shows banging my head in the first row. Hope they bounce back and fill the gap. Of the new lot there is Spiked Crib who have been around for quite a few years and are constantly enhancing their presence.

Having mentioned the current state of affairs, India cannot be on the global map for their contribution to black metal unless there are bands that mean business. Maybe there are other black metal acts that haven’t been noticed but then that is where the respective bands are lacking. Hoping for a phase where we have a significant change in the Indian scene concerning this genre that is always considered underground but is a success nevertheless. Mauling down a religious establishment could be a good start, anyone?

Check out this article on the newly launched Flaming Skull E-Zine here : The Flaming Skull E-Zine : May 2010 issue

Also read :

category : Interactions/Interviews

category : Recommendations

category : Album Reviews


%d bloggers like this: